Walk In Her Shoes Challenge: Day 2

Day 2 of the Walk In Her Shoes challenge and the weather forecast wasn’t looking promising for getting out and walking a lot.

20150317 Not a good outlook

It was still fine in the morning though, so I wanted to do as much as I could before the rain arrived. On this morning’s walk I achieved something I set myself to achieve this week, which was to walk 6 km in under an hour. I’ve been managing to do 3.5 km in under 35 minutes, but I didn’t know if I could keep the pace up for 6 km. It seems I can.

20150317 6 km 1

This was about 8,000 steps.

Today’s leggings.

20150317 Leggings

This is one of my favourite pairs. I love the pattern and the colours. They’re thicker than most of my other pairs and I was going to change them later in the day when the weather got a bit warmer. It didn’t, so I didn’t. (The sticker has been on there for months. Probably years. Courtesy of Juniordwarf.)

By lunch time I’d only reached about 11,000 steps, so I went for a long walk after lunch. It still hadn’t rained, though it was trying to. I checked out the new coffee van on The Esplanade (it’s good) and walked around to Tynwald Park up the steps.

This part of the walk always reminds me of Picnic at Hanging Rock.

20150317 Hanging rock-esque IG

After dinner it was time for another walk to get me up to my 25,000 step goal. It was raining by this time and my walking buddy Zoe doesn’t have a rain coat, so she had to share mine.

20150317 Zoe doesn't have a rain coat

Goal achieved. All going well.

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Trip Day 3 (Part 2): Dove Lake

So we made it to Dove Lake, along with every other tourist in the park and, even though it was windy, we decided we’d attempt the Dove Lake Circuit.

Juniordwarf near Dove Lake

Juniordwarf near Dove Lake

It’s recommended that you do the circuit clockwise. Unlike other walks we’ve done recently, we saw this sign so decided to do it as recommended. I’m not really sure why they recommend this, but that’s the way we went.

Cradle Mountain & Dove Lake from the car park

Cradle Mountain & Dove Lake from the car park

Off we go!

Off we go!

The first stop on the way round is called Glacier Rock, to the east.

Apparently it is evidence of glacier action in the region during the last Ice Age. It’s a big rock above Dove Lake that you can step up and out onto to get a nice view of Cradle Mountain. If you dare.

Glacier Rock - if you dare

Glacier Rock – if you dare

It’s not a pleasant place to be in gusty winds and I was terrified. I went as far onto the rock as I dared (not very far), took my photo and sat down because I was terrified of being blown off. I wasn’t prepared to die for a better angle. (Did I mention I’m not good with heights?) Then I gradually edged my way off the rock and left it to the people who were less worried and stayed on there for ages taking selfies.

From the top of Glacier Rock

From the top of Glacier Rock

We were glad to be off it (I can’t speak for the others. I was mighty relieved to be off it) and back on the walking track. Even though it was windy, we were protected from that for most of the walk, so it wasn’t as unpleasant as it seemed like it might have been. It was a lovely walk.

The outward leg of the walk was mostly boardwalk. It wasn’t a particularly challenging walk, so Juniordwarf had no trouble on the walk, and we saw kids even younger than him out there too.

Me and Juniordwarf

Me and Juniordwarf

I loved watching our view of Cradle Mountain change as we approached it. It dipped in and out of cloud, and as we got closer some of its features became more obvious.

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

As we were walking we saw some white streaks on the rocks on the mountain on the other side of the lake. I thought they might be waterfalls, but they were too far away to be sure. As we got closer we started to hear the water and could see it moving, so I knew I’d been right. From a distance they could have just been streaky white rocks!

Waterfalls or white rock streaks?

Waterfalls or white rock streaks?

Correct. Waterfall.

Correct. Waterfall.

Rounding the top end of the lake you get as close as you’re going to get to Cradle Mountain on this particular track. It looks quite different from this angle.

Nearing Cradle Mountain

Nearing Cradle Mountain

Looking back at Dove Lake

Looking back at Dove Lake

Looking back at the board walk

Looking back at the board walk

At the top of the circuit

At the top of the circuit

Stunning rock formations

Stunning rock formations

A different perspective of Cradle Mountain

A different perspective of Cradle Mountain

The return track is less consistent than the outgoing track and is a bit more hilly. A lot of the track is gravel, and because of the amount of water on the ground, Slabs remarked that it felt a bit like walking in a creek bed. It was a bit tricky to negotiate in places.

We passed through the beautiful Ballroom Forest, which is a cool-temperate rainforest with predominantly Myrtle Beech trees.

Ballroom Forest

Ballroom Forest

We could see Horrible Glacier Rock over on the other side of the lake.

Glacier Rock from a distance

Glacier Rock from a distance

Glacier Rock

Glacier Rock

The views from this side of Dove Lake are possibly the most commonly photographed.

Photobombing bird

Photobombing bird

Towards the end of the track you get to the Boat Shed, which was built in 1940. It’s no longer used, but it’s a particularly popular photo spot. In fact it’s compulsory to take a photo of Cradle Mountain and Dove Lake with the Boat Shed in the foreground. They check your camera on the way out, and if you haven’t taken a photo of that scene, you have to go back and do it*.

Boat House and obscured mountain

Boat House and obscured mountain

And that was the end of the walk. We arrived back in the car park, signed off our walk (you’re supposed to register every walk you do before you go) and waited for the bus to take us back to the Visitor Centre. We worked out that the whole circuit had taken about 2 hours 15 minutes, which we thought was good going with a little person who hasn’t done a lot of this type of walking.

We enjoyed a well-deserved refreshment at the bar before dinner, and Juniordwarf played (and won) his first 8-Ball game.

And with that, our holiday was over. We headed back home the next day, which (of course) was the most beautiful warm and sunny day.

*Might not actually be true.

Lake Dobson

I’m linking up to Kim’s Sunday Selections at Frogpondsrock today.

Last time we went to Mt Field National Park we drove the 16 km road to Lake Dobson but we didn’t have a good look around.

Monday was a public holiday, so we decided it might be nice to go back up there and do the circuit around the lake. The official title of the walk is the Pandani Grove Nature Walk, and it skirts around one side of the lake, passing through the Pandani Grove, and ending up on the 4WD track that goes higher up the mountain (or back to the car park in our case).

This is the area that gets snow in winter, and it has several long day walks that we aren’t quite ready to tackle just yet. The drive up to the lake takes you from the beautiful lush rainforest at the bottom of the park through changing vegetation to the completely different sub-alpine landscape higher up the mountain. The change over such a short space is remarkable.

I took my old SLR camera with me – I don’t remember the last time I used it. When Juniordwarf was about a year old, I think. I haven’t had those photos developed yet, so here are some that I took with my phone and uploaded to Instagram.

P365 – Day 43 fossicking and other stories (12/2/2011)

We thought it would be nice to have a weekend away before Juniordwarf starts school and swimming lessons next week. 
We decided on Dover, south of Huonville this time, because neither Slabs nor I had been there, and there were public fossicking areas near Lune River, a few km south of Dover.
Juniordwarf is quite interested in rocks at the moment, so we though picking up rocks would be something he’d enjoy. He has a large bag full of rocks that he collected over the Xmas break and every time we go into the local rock shop, he usually comes out with a new tumbled stone to add to his collection.
After having lunch in Dover, we travelled down to Lune River, which is the furthest south I’ve ever been, to start our rock adventure at Lunaris Gemstones, which has a showroom of rocks, fossils, crystals and tumbled stones. Some of the crystals were quite stunning and I suspect Lil Sis and Mr Tall would have had a lovely, (and expensive) time there.
We were pointed in the right direction to the public fossicking areas, and drove around a bit looking for a good place to stop. We had absolutely no idea what to look for – other than rocks that we liked the look of – apparently the main finds in the area are agate and petrified wood. We hadn’t even thought to take any tools with us, so we were restricted to what was lying around.
Juniordwarf loved it. He was on a special mission to find a pretty rock for his favourite coffee shop lady, so that was his first task. But once he’d found a rock for Coffee Lady, he wanted to take every rock home that he picked up. We had to call a halt when the bag started to get too heavy.
I ended up being more interested in this little chap than in the rocks . . .
After our rock excursion, we headed back to Dover and had coffee. Juniordwarf was very impressed with the size of his babycino.
But I don’t think Coffee Lady has anything to fear about this type of competition. She’s still his favourite, because she ties her hair up.